Home Opinion Institutions in Morocco: Development Challenges?

Institutions in Morocco: Development Challenges?

By Hafid Akrout

Morocco World News

Brussels, April 21, 2012

What are the challenges facing our institutional building in Post-Arab revolts? Morocco is believed to be a model country in North Africa. Therefore, democratic institutions should be empowered to exercise their full functions liberally and effectively, corruptions should be combated, and clear guidelines ought to define the function of these different institutions.

Arab spring shows both the necessity for change in Morocco and the risks. Bloody Revolutions in Egypt and Libya and elsewhere may not necessarily bring political stability and good governance. Unlike Tunisia, Libya and Egypt, democratic institutions in Morocco are strong and prepared as they push for political and economic reforms. Arab spring shows also that Morocco was an exception, since the King Mohammed VI, responded to demands for democracy with political reform, not tear gas and bullets. Although institutional changes and economic developments are perceived as a slow moving scheme, they have been launched years before  the arable revolts. If the political willingness exists along with free institutions, then the major challenges for the coming years will be to empower those institutions, clean them from any form of corruption and most importantly separate their fields of specialties.

The empowerment of Institutions should not focus only on political ones. Social Development is strongly linked with economic and educational institutions as well. The urgent task at-hand is to start constructive debates about the structure and the functioning of these institutions. The views of Historians, Sociologists, and Psychologists, Legislators must be combined to improve the quality of institutions in Morocco, and, consequently, strengthen service delivery and promote transparency and state accountability, it is essential to enhance the capability of civil society groups and leaders to promote a strong and fair legal framework, and, ultimately, greater confidence in the constitution as a blue print for future legislative reform.

It is a fact that Morocco is an Islamic State. However, the religious institutions should not be excluded from reforms and developments whenever it is needed. Religious leaders should be aware of their missions, capacities and limits. The fate of our societies should not remain between the hands of a group of religious thinkers.

Hospitals and medical centers must find answers for the health problems, while universities and Research centers should develop both sciences and human capital. Moreover, the actual reform of media in Morocco should explore both the financial and ethical dimensions of free media. Modern Morocco cannot be free without a free press, and one sign of any dictatorship is the silencing of the media. Our media should also exercise its function freely and objectively. Newspapers, radio and television networks, must investigate the workings of government and report on them without fear of prosecution.

To improve rule of law in Morocco, and, consequently, promote transparency and state accountability, it is essential to enhance the capability of civil society groups and leaders to promote a strong and fair legal framework, and, ultimately, greater confidence in the institutions as a blue print for future legislative reform.

Edited by Leila Hanafi

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