Rabat - The word coup d’état which is foreign to the English language is, today, foreign to the youth and the world. It is definitely a thing of the past. It was a common practice in the 60s, 70s, 80s and to, a certain extent, in the 90s of the last century in Latin America, Africa and Asia. In many cases, low-ranking officers will gang up to overthrow an existing regime by the force of arms, like what happened in Uganda with Idi Amin taking power in January 1971 and ruling ruthlessly until 1979. There was, also, the dramatic case of General Augusto Pinochet overthrowing the democratic government of the leftist Salvador Allende of the Socialist Unidad Popular party in Chile on September 11, 1973, at the instigation of the American government. Pinochet ruled with an iron fist from 1974 until 1990.

Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Dr Mohamed Chtatou is a professor at the University of Mohammed V in Rabat.