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Morocco Suffers from a Shortage of Blood Donation

Rabat – On the occasion of the national Blood Donor day, Dr. Najia Amraoui, official at the National Center for Inoculation and Blood Besearch called on the public to donate blood amid a nationwide shortage of blood donation.

The center’s findings indicated that despite the increase of  the number of blood donors (297,700) in 2015, the country is still in shortage of blood donation, as 2016 recorded a number of 310,680 donors, which represents 0.95% of the total population.

This  ratio remains below the recommendations  of the World Health Organization, which requires at least 1% of the population to donate blood, underlined El Amraoui.

The country is in a critical position, where the challenge is to raise the number of regular blood donors to ensure a safe ratio of blood, according to the same source.

Blood donation has to be regular, since platelets last only for five days and red cells last for 42 days, stressed the official.

She also explained  that men can donate blood once each two months, while women can do so once every three months with no significant health effects.

She pointed out that if Moroccans rolled their sleeves and  volunteered twice during the past year, the total number of donors would have  moved to more than 600,000, and secureD the World Health Organizations’ recommendations.

To reinforce blood donation in the Kingdom, the National Center for Inoculation and Blood Research, together with the Moroccan Red Crescent, medical NGOs and artistic and sports figures promise  to organize  awareness seminars on blood donation. On the occasion of  the Moroccan Blood Donors Day in Morocco, which takes place on March 30, the country holds campaigns every year to donate blood and awareness-raising activities on  the importance of donating this vital substance.

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