Morocco: Alleged Gender Segregation Order  in Spas Creates Controversy 

Morocco: Alleged Gender Segregation Order  in Spas Creates Controversy 

Chaima Lahsini
spas and beauty centers

Rabat – Fez spas and beauty centers will remain mixed, contrary to what some news outlets reported Thursday morning. L’economiste was the first to report on its website a “prohibition of mixing in Fez.”

According to the economic newspaper, the Fez Mayor Idrizz El Azami decided during a Communal Council held yesterday to implement a segregation order on spas and beauty centers in Fez, ruling that these establishments will have to provide separates spaces for men and women.

News of the presumed “order” was quickly picked up by other media, igniting a heated debate on social media as many Internet users were shocked to hear of a segregation order in Morocco.

Social media users were quick to blame what they described as a “retrograde decision” on the council members, a majority of which are from the Justice and Development Party (PJD), and they accused the PJD members of uncovering their real radical “wahabist” faces.

However, the spiritual city will still welcome men and women alike into its renowned spas, beauty salons, and thermal stations.

A source close to Morocco World News present at the Council’s meeting denied the existence of such decree, stating that the Communal Council only issued a recommendation stressing the need of vigilant monitoring of these establishments to ensure conformity to standard operations procedures.

Moreover, the mayor himself refuted the report. In a statement to Alyaoum24, he explained that the order was a simple collective decision to regulate the practice conditions of barbershops and beauty centers, and he denied any mentions of spas and beauty centers.

The Communal Council does not have enough clearance to issue an order of such magnitude. Only the Ministry of Interior has the authority to implement segregation orders, whether in public or private institutions.

Edited by Alexander Jusdanis 

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