Report Reveals Decay of ‘National Values’ in Moroccan Schools

Report Reveals Decay of ‘National Values’ in Moroccan Schools

Morocco World News
The head of the Supreme Council of Education, Training and Scientific Research Omar Azziman
The head of the Supreme Council of Education, Training and Scientific Research Omar Azziman

Rabat – The Chairman of the Higher Council for Education, Training and Scientific Research (CSEFRS), Omar Azziman, presented a report on values within the Moroccan school system at a press conference on Wednesday, underlining the council’s discovery of a degradation of “shared national values” in education.

“There is a huge disparity between the discourse on values, rights and obligations and day-to-day practices,” stresses the CSEFRS’ report.

The council pointed out the “special attention” given by governmental reforms since the 2011 constitution to “shared national values” such as Islam, cultural diversity, social life, democracy, human rights and dialogue between civilizations.

The document blames the decline of these values on the failure of pedagogical approaches in nurturing and consolidating values among Moroccan students.

The CSEFRS also notes the proliferation of cheating violence, gender inequality, harassment and the violation of human rights in Moroccan schools.

In the same vein, the report indicates that Moroccan schools generally are engaged in practices harming the environment as well as the properties of citizens.

In reaction to the observed decay, the Higher Council recommends a return to the shared national values.

“It is worth highlighting that values education is a shared responsibility amongst school, family, media and all the other institutions working in the fields of education, culture and mentoring in a complementary way,” said the report.

The report is the CSEFRS’ first major action since the appointment of Mohamed Hassad as the new Minister of National Education, Vocational Training, Higher Education, and Scientific Research.

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